How You Can Get Your Pet Their Own No-Sew Fleece Blanket

Seeing as how the cats love their blanket, here’s how you can get your cat (and dog) a blanket of their very own!

Cats — These no sew blankets are super comfy and made of reversible fleece. They come in either a green or red cool cat print. The green blanket reverses to solid purple while the red reverses to solid lime green.

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Order the green blanket here: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/251596038087?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

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Order the red blanket here: http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=251603259391

Dogs: The dog blanket is an adorable bone print no sew fleece blanket that is again reversible to solid blue. With the dog blanket, you have the option of using it as a bed. On the back, there is a Velcro closure where you can insert a foam pad.

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Order the dog blanket here: http://www.ebay.ca/itm/251596042773?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

 

The Cats Get Their Own Blankets

None of the cats — Nose, Pippy, Peanut or Socks were ever really interested in laying on blankets before. And don’t even bother trying to get them to lay on their own bed — they won’t even give you the satisfaction of sniffing and considering using a bed. Snobs! So I was surprised to see this happen:

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(from left to right is Socks, Nose and Pippy)

Peanut has been on the same blanket as well. I’m shocked. Why all of the sudden do they like blankets?

Since one isn’t enough, this happened:

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Yep, had to get a new blanket for them. These cats are spoiled!

Balinese

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Balinese cats are essentially long-haired Siamese. In fact, original Siam breeders were horrified in the early 1900s when long-haired kittens began to naturally appear. Quietly, these kittens were given away as pets. In the 1940s, a breeder in New York and a breeder in California decided to make the Balinese a true breed by using the existing Balinese and Siamese cats. It took another 30 years for Siamese breeders to come around and learn to appreciate that long hair. (It’s just hair!)

Long, lithe and muscular, Balinese weigh just under 10 pounds while females weigh about 5 to 7 pounds. Balinese have flat foreheads, wedge-shaped muzzles and almond-shaped beautiful blue eyes. The ears are large and pointed, the neck is slender, legs are long and thin and the tail is long and tapered.

Balinese have long, silky coats that nestles right up against the body, appearing shorter than it really is. The hair on the tail is semi-long and soft and spreads out in a plume. Without a downy undercoat, the Balinese doesn’t require a ridiculous grooming routine.

Afghan Hound

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Group: Hound

In 19th century Afghanistan Westerners first discovered Afghan hounds. Originally they served as hunters and herders which they’ve done for several thousand years.

Size: 45 to 65 pounds. 24 to 29 inches.

Color: all.

Life span: Up to 14 years.

Health problems: Cataract, necrotic myelopathy, hip dysplasia.

Afghan hounds have narrow heads and are tall and slender, they’re covered in long, silky hair. Long necks lead down a straight back to upright, curled tails. (Underneath all that hair, they resemble Greyhounds.)

Afghans are described as “catlike.” They have an aloof personality and won’t always come when called. When they want attention, they will seek out whomever they want it from. Males are generally more aloof than females. They don’t like loud noises or sudden movements, and therefore do better with older children. They are very patient. Afghans are fine around other pets, but will chase strange animals out of their yard.

Afghans do need to live in a home, they don’t do well in apartments. You might also want to build a high fence; Afghans are great leapers. A good half-hour daily walk will serve your Afghan well mentally and physically. A daily brushing is ideal although your Afghan can stay beautiful with brushing every two or three days. If your Afghan gets dirty, bathe him before you brush. You’ll avoid extra tangles and hair breakage.

Top 3 Cat Skin Disorders

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Feline Alopecia (or bald spots). This cat is itchy with a capital I. He’s probably biting at his hair — a lot — and may be experiencing behavioral problems. The causes are varied — a hypersensitivity reaction (a flea allergy or food allergy), parasites (lice or mites), fungus (ringworm) or psychogenic (experiencing a behavioral or psychological disorder that causes them to rip out their hair). Since the causes are varied, so are the treatments. You’ll have to get your cat to the vet who will run the necessary tests. That will determine the appropriate treatment and, hopefully, Kitty can get back to his fluffy, lustrous coated self.

Eosinophilic Granuloma. An eosinophil is a type of immune system cell that helps to kill bacteria. Granuloma is a swelling that gathers in an area where many eosinophils are concentrated. A granuloma tries to kill an infection, but doesn’t fully succeed. There are usually skin or gum lesions on the infected cat. Their skin may be red or have erosions or ulcers on the skin. The lesions aren’t itchy or painful however. This often happens in kittens 6 to 12 months old and sometimes clear up without medical intervention. To get a diagnosis, a blood test and skin scraping will be done. There is always an underlying cause for the eosinophils to overreact, but this is not life threatening for your cat. To help speed up the healing process, steroids or systemic antibiotics may be prescribed.

Miliary dermatitis. The “miliary” part stems from millet seeds because the skin lesions are tiny, round bumps that are often crusty and found on the cat’s back and resemble millet seeds. There are many causes for military dermatitis: lice, mites, an environmental sensitivity, food reaction or an immune-related component, even a reaction to medication. A skin scrape, fungal culture or allergy test can confirm the diagnosis. Treatments vary: immunotherapy, adding supplements, antihistamines or steroids.

American Wirehair

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American Wirehairs are named for their distinctive coats. Their fur is coarse, stiff, dense, springy to the touch and resilient. The hair gives the coat a crimped appearance and all the cat’s hair is crimped, including the whiskers and ear hair. Altogether, the coat appears in ringlets, looking rather wave-like. The coat’s appearance is a natural occurrence; they were not bred for it.

American Wirehairs are medium to large size. Wirehairs have round heads with prominent cheekbones and well-developed chins and muzzles. They eyes are set well apart. Males weigh in at about 8 to 11 pounds, females tend to be 6 to 9 pounds.

In 1966, five wire-haired kittens were born to barn cats on a farm in Verona, New York. Unfortunately, four of these kittens were killed by a weasel and no more subsequent litters produced other Wirehair kittens. The remaining kitten, Adam was bred with an ordinary calico. They produced two Wirehair kittens and two regular coat kittens.

American English Coonhound

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Group: Hound

American English Coonhounds were bred from English Coonhounds brought over to the New World and Virginia Hounds which came from early settlers. Bloodhounds were added into the bloodline to increase the sense of smell as American English Coonhounds were used for recreational hunting.

Size: 40 to 65 pounds. 21 to 27 inches.

Color: Ticked red or blue and white, tricolored, red and white or black and white.

Life span: Up to 12 years.

Health problems: Hip dysplasia.

American English Coonhounds are known for their speed and with their muscular, lean bodies, it’s no wonder. English have strong backs, deep chests and have well-defined muscles. If these dogs were humans, they would be the Olympians.

The English are good natured and sociable, yet strong willed and can be prone to stubbornness. Training requires extra patience. As puppies, they require constant exercise and are uber exuberant. They will seek out your attention incessantly. As they grow to adulthood, they are incessant nesters — avoid this breed if you don’t want your dog on the furniture. All around though, they do make great family poets and an adequate watch dog.