Manchester Terrier

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AKC Group: Terrier

The Manchester district of England was a noted center for two “poor men’s sports,” rat killing and rabbit coursing. A fancier by the name of John Hulme, with the idea of producing a dog that
could be used at both contests, mated a Whippet female with a celebrated rat-killing dog, a crossbred terrier dark brown in color.

Size: 15 to 16 inches high; 12 to 22 pounds. (The toy Manchester cannot exceed 12 pounds, while the Standard size cannot exceed 22 pounds.)

Color: Black and tan

Life span: 15 to 16 years

Sleek but sturdy, friendly but discerning, neither aggressive nor shy, and usually agreeable with kids and other dogs. Most terriers were created for country life, but Manchesters began as
urbanites with city folk that wanted a compact pet with big-dog style. A Manchester is easily recognized by his close fitting coat of mahogany and jet black. Their heads are long and wedge-shaped with tan spots above the eyes. Machesters are fast runners. Manchesters do well with kids and other companion animals. Training should be a breeze. The Manchester is a spirited, bright and loyal dog that does possess that independent terrier streak. Brush him weekly andbathe when necessary.

Scottish Fold

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The first Scottish Fold feline was found by Scottish shepherd William Ross on his neighbor’s farm in the Tayside Region in 1961. He asked about the cat’s heritage and learned that the cat, Susie, was born to a straight-eared mom and an unknown father. Enamored, they scored a folded-ear offspring of Susie that they named Snooks. They immediately began exploring how to create this “lop-eared” breed. They bred Snooks to British shorthairs and other local barn cats. Unfortunately, creating a Scottish Fold isn’t guaranteed, for every kitten has a 50/50 chance. At least one parent must possess the necessary folded ear gene. All kittens are born with straight ears. If they curl, it starts at 3 to 4 weeks of age.

Do not worry, these felines do not have hearing problems because of the fold. They do require help (on a biweekly basis) to help keep their ears clean though.

Some of the fun poses Scottish Fold find themselves in include the Prairie Dog (when something catches their interest, the cats stand up like a Prarie Dog) and the Buddha Sit (they stretch out their legs and put their paws on their belly).

The Scottish Fold is a round cat. A round head, round eyes, bodies and whisker pads. Take a picture and just draw circles on every body part for proof. Roly-poly, they even seem to exhibit a permanent Cheshire-Cat grin. Those eyes by the way are soulful and oversized. This has earned them the nickname “Owl in a Cat Suit.” The Scottish Fold comes in all colors and patterns.

A Scottish Fold is an extremely devoted companion that tends to bond to just one person at a time. However, they love to cuddle, so even if you aren’t his number one, he’ll still love to snuggle (just maybe not as much). An extremely laidback feline, they love all kids, dogs and other felines. They tend not to care about traveling (road trip!). When they run out of energy, don’t panic if they simply flop over. They love hard, can play hard, so they must sleep hard.

More reasons to fall in love? A Scottish Fold tend to eat with their paws. They have soft, sweet, mild-mannered, soft-spoken, intelligent, adaptable, sweet tempered personalities. They can easily be taught to fetch. One word of warning: They also easily learn to open cabinet doors — so lock up health hazards and/or valuables.