Miniature Australian Shepherd

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AKC Group: Herding

The Miniature Australian Shepherd came to fruition in California during the late 1960s. They were used to herd small livestock like sheep and goats, though they do have the determination to herd larger stock. Their loveable nature ensured that they had a place inside the home too. They became quite popular with the equestrian set by accompanying them to shows.

Size: 13 to 18 inches high; 20 to 40 pounds

Color: Solid black, red/liver; red/liver, blue merle. May have white markings on the face, chest and legs.

Life span: 13 to 15 years

Health problems: Progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, microphthalmia, hip dysplasia, degenerative myelopathy.

The Miniature American Shepherd is a small herding dog. Highly intelligent and biddable, the breed is often trained for dog sports such as herding, agility, obedience, disc dog and flyball. They are easy to train, enthusiastic and persistent (especially when herding) dogs that make a lovely companion whether you live in the city or country. This is such a loyal little dog. I hope your children like to be herded. The Miniature Australian Shepherd is neither shy nor aggressive. He is a herder. Have I mentioned that? It’s super important because he’s super great at it. It’s okay, though, it’s natural and totally normal. They’re herders; they love to herd. Got that? đŸ˜‰

The Miniature Australian Shepherd may not realize that he’s a small dog. His body should suggest strength. They sport natural bobtails or they will have a docked tail that won’t exceed three inches. The coat is medium in length and may be straight or curly with moderate feathering on the back of the legs. Both sexes sport a moderate mane, though it may be more pronounced on males.

Mastiff

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AKC Group: Working

The Mastiff descended from the now extinct Pugnaces Britanniae. “Mastiff” comes from the Anglo-Saxon word “masty” meaning “powerful.” It is recognized as the oldest breed of English dog. It is believed to have been brought to Britain in the 6th century BC. They were used for the blood sports of bull, bear and lion baiting as well as dog fighting. There is evidence to say that the Mastiff was brought to the New World via the Mayflower, though actual documentation begins in the late 1800s. In 1835, the UK passed the Cruelty to Animals Act that prohibited the baiting of animals and the popularity of the Mastiff began to wane.

Size: 27.5 to 30 inches tall; 175 to 200 pounds

Color: Fawn, apricot or brindle

Life span: 10 to 12 years

Health problems: Luxating patella, strokes, epilepsy, spinal problems, eye problems, thyroid disorders, osteochrondritis dissecans, hypertrophic osteodystrophy, hip or elbow dysplasia, heart defects, bloat, kidney problems, and sensitivity to drugs and chemicals. During the sticky summer months, Mastiffs can suffer from heatstroke.

The Mastiff is a giant dog, with a muscular and powerful build. An alert and keen looking dog, they look menacing without even having to move. The coat of the Mastiff is close fitting, short, and sleek. They may have black markings around and/or between the eyes. Small ears fold down toward the sides of his head. An occasional brushing and wipe down with a damp cloth is all the grooming requirements your Mastiff needs. A Mastiff sheds constantly but lightly.

A dignified, courageous, and loyal dog, a Mastiff has a pleasant nature and a high level of intelligence. Due to his size, he makes an effective deterrent/watchdog. Despite their look, the Mastiff has a even temper and docile nature (unless they’ve been raised not to). Early socialization and confident, assertive training are required. A Mastiff is not a difficult dog to train. If you spend frequent time away from home, a Mastiff is not the dog for you; they thrive on companionship and affection. A Mastiff is not an overly active dog; he does best with a moderate amount of exercise. They don’t bark that much. Unfortunately, they are too large for apartment dwelling. They need a safe, secure yard in which to play and exercise. They should do great with children and animals (though they may try to dominate) that they’ve been raised with. If you’re doing a great job with him, your Mastiff should be friendly and welcoming to guests. If he isn’t, you’ve done something wrong.

Scottish Fold

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The first Scottish Fold feline was found by Scottish shepherd William Ross on his neighbor’s farm in the Tayside Region in 1961. He asked about the cat’s heritage and learned that the cat, Susie, was born to a straight-eared mom and an unknown father. Enamored, they scored a folded-ear offspring of Susie that they named Snooks. They immediately began exploring how to create this “lop-eared” breed. They bred Snooks to British shorthairs and other local barn cats. Unfortunately, creating a Scottish Fold isn’t guaranteed, for every kitten has a 50/50 chance. At least one parent must possess the necessary folded ear gene. All kittens are born with straight ears. If they curl, it starts at 3 to 4 weeks of age.

Do not worry, these felines do not have hearing problems because of the fold. They do require help (on a biweekly basis) to help keep their ears clean though.

Some of the fun poses Scottish Fold find themselves in include the Prairie Dog (when something catches their interest, the cats stand up like a Prarie Dog) and the Buddha Sit (they stretch out their legs and put their paws on their belly).

The Scottish Fold is a round cat. A round head, round eyes, bodies and whisker pads. Take a picture and just draw circles on every body part for proof. Roly-poly, they even seem to exhibit a permanent Cheshire-Cat grin. Those eyes by the way are soulful and oversized. This has earned them the nickname “Owl in a Cat Suit.” The Scottish Fold comes in all colors and patterns.

A Scottish Fold is an extremely devoted companion that tends to bond to just one person at a time. However, they love to cuddle, so even if you aren’t his number one, he’ll still love to snuggle (just maybe not as much). An extremely laidback feline, they love all kids, dogs and other felines. They tend not to care about traveling (road trip!). When they run out of energy, don’t panic if they simply flop over. They love hard, can play hard, so they must sleep hard.

More reasons to fall in love? A Scottish Fold tend to eat with their paws. They have soft, sweet, mild-mannered, soft-spoken, intelligent, adaptable, sweet tempered personalities. They can easily be taught to fetch. One word of warning: They also easily learn to open cabinet doors — so lock up health hazards and/or valuables.

Maltese

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AKC Group: Toy

The Maltese breed is one of the oldest European toy breeds and, in fact, one of the oldest dog breeds overall. Charles Darwin had traced the breed back to 6000 BC. The exact origins are
unknown, but the common theory is the Maltese was developed on the island of Malta in the Mediterranean Sea. They developed from a Spitz-like dog used for hunting in marshes and wooded areas in Southern Europe. Other people believe the Maltese developed in Asia from the Lhasa Apso, Tibetan Terrier and Spaniel and Pekingese.

Size: 9 to 10 inches high; under 7 pounds.

Color: White

Life span: 12 to 14 years

Health problems: Glaucoma, deafness, thyroid problems, low blood sugar, sensitivity to drugs or chemicals, dental problems, luxating patella, progressive retinal atrophy and entropion.

As a toy breed, the Maltese is a small, dainty dog that have the sweetest expression. The coat is long and straight and silk to the touch. Brush him daily. Clip every few months. Check his eyes and ears often and trim bottom hair.

This popular breed is mild mannered, affectionate and loving. Their intelligence and alertness make training a breeze. The only problem he will probably give you is housebreaking. Crating is most effective in this situation. (If you try pee pads, your Maltese will expect to be able to go on any paper left on the floor.) Energetic and spirited, Maltese love to play. To keep his mind engaged, give him a variety of mentally stimulating toys. They thrive on attention, so if you travel a lot or don’t have time to devote to him, consider another breed. He doesn’t like rough treatment, so gentle children are his favorite. They are polite to strangers and usually don’t present any problems to companion animals. They do not have a problem standing up to a larger breed of dog. By nature, Maltese are standoffish. To combat this, socialize often and early. Always discourage barking.

Belgian Malinois

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AKC Group: Herding

Originally part of a variety of the Belgium Shepherd dog, the Malinois was developed in the city of Malines in the 1900s. The breed quickly became a favorite of the city and the country.

Size: 22 to 26 inches; 55 to 75 pounds

Color: Rich fawn to mahogany. They have black tipped hairs and a black mask and ears.

Life span: 12 to 14 years

Health problems: Skin allergies, eye problems, excessive shyness or aggressiveness. Very rarely seen are hip or elbow dysplasia.

The Belgian Malinois is a high-energy breed that is a favorite among the police and military sets. Often mistaken for a German Shepherd, the Malinois is more elegant and lighter-boned. The Belgian Malinois is well muscled, strong, agile and full of life. They have almond shaped eyes and stiff, ever erect ears that are shaped like an equilateral triangle. The tail has a slight curve. He has a smooth, short-haired coat that is easy to groom. Brush regularly with a firm, bristle brush and bathe only when necessary. (Too much bathing will remove the waterproofness of his coat.) Malinois shed heavily twice a year.

Malinois have a tendency to bond to one or two people intensely. They make an excellent watchdog as they are very protective and territorial. Some Malinois are overly shy from birth and this can be exacerbated by too little socialization. In reality, they need to be socialized starting immediately followed with firm, but loving training. Alert and playful, they love to be with their family doing all your activities. You should tire long before he does. If they’ve been raised with a cat, you’ll probably never have to worry. With other dogs, however, they may be dominant. During their first year, expect him to act out. This is normal and acceptable behavior for puppies, but be sure to nip this in the bud so he doesn’t continue to do it as an adult. As the breed tends to experience several different behavior phases over their first year, and it’s imperative they learn what you consider acceptable behavior for them. Avoid harshness in your voice as much as possible as Malinois are very sensitive to tones and will react accordingly. If your Malinois continues to experience excessive shyness or aggression after puppyhood, as hereditary traits, you will need to seek advice from a professional trainer. Always be firm, reward with praise and employ positive reinforcements. A puppy obedience class will help the both of you immensely. Seriously consider one.

Lowchen

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AKC Group: Non-sporting
The first depiction of a Lowchen dates back to medieval times. Debate still centers on whether they originated from Germany or Italy, though they were a common dog in all of Europe by the 15th century. World War II saw an almost extinction. In fact, the Guinness Book of Records listed the Lowchen as the World’s Rarest Breed of Dog in the 1960s. Concerted breeding efforts have taken them off that list.
Size: 10 to 14 inches high; 10 to 18 pounds
Color: All colors and combinations occur
Life span: 13 to 15 years
Health problems: With such a small population to work from in the 20th century, Lowchen are actually an extremely inbred breed. Thankfully, they don’t tend to experience many health problems. The main problem noted is patellar luxation: a condition in which the kneecap pops out of place. It often occurs in puppyhood and appears as a lameness or pain in a rear leg and is corrected with surgery.
A Lowchen is an active, affectionate, gentle dog that is unafraid to challenge authority nor to fight another dog of the same sex to establish dominance. Meanwhile, the Lowchen is an intelligent, lively, fun dog that is overly exuberant. Outgoing and alert, the Lowchen is an adaptable dog. On the negative side, they can be arrogant or strong willed at times. If you love a lap cat, er, dog, a Lowchen may be for you. They love a welcoming lap. Treat a Lowchen like a baby, be constantly watchful. When an undesirable behavior is exhibited, nip it in the bud immediately. When this is established, eventually all it will take is a stern look or a word you choose to announce your unhappiness. A Lowchen is highly intelligent and eager to please, so training shouldn’t be overly difficult. They love agility and obedience tasks. Early socialization is important to avoid becoming distrustful and snappy. As with most breeds, gentle, fair, firm and consistent training is all it takes. Discourage barking and digging.
This toy breed is related to the Bichon. The Lowchen has a long, silky coat presented in a lion-like cut. The haunches, back legs, front legs (except ankle bracelets) and the 1/3 of the tail closest to the body should be shaved. The rest of the coat is left natural so the dog looks lion like. The head features a short, wide muzzle. The coat should be fluffy and have a mix of thick and fine hairs. This makes their coat neither frizzy nor fly-away. The coat should be neither soft nor harsh. To prevent tangles, comb and brush regularly. Lowchens tend to shed very little, if at all. Dead hair is usually brushed out.

Lhasa Apso

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AKC Group: Non-sporting
The Lhasa Apso is the most popular breed indigenous to Tibet. “Apso” means goat-like. In Tibet, the Lhasa Apso remain a treasured dog of the privileged. They were used as watch dogs in temples and monasteries. In Tibet, you were never able to purchase or sell a dog, a Lhasa Apso was always given as a gift and receiving one was considered a great honor. Developed 800 years ago, their first appearance in the West was in 1901 when an English lady returned home with several.
Size: 9 to 11 inches tall; 12 to 16 pounds
Color: All colors
Life span: 12 to 18 years
Health problems: Luxating patella, entropion, hip dysplasia, progressive retinal atrophy, von Willebrand’s Disease, spinal problems, cataracts, allergies, skin problems and bladder stones have all been noted.
The Lhasa Apso is a happy, loyal, gentle dog that is full of spirit and character. When they need to alert you, they will. Though they look super cute and cuddly, a Lhasa Apso can be strong willed, bossy, stubborn, dominant and manipulative or even jealous. They can be difficult to train and housebreak. They do not like to be teased or roughly handled. They don’t like boisterous kids nor strangers, to whom they will be wary and standoffish. Once he knows you, he will be friendly and welcoming. He usually gets along well with other companion animals, depending on his mood at the time. The right owner who provides the right training can turn a Lhasa Apso into a very fine companion indeed. They love their exercise time — but really only require a regular walk and a secured area to play when the mood strikes. Training will require your patience. Firstly, establish a relationship of mutual respect. Admire him for his independence, but consistently enforce the rules. Incorporate food and praise into training to make him more cooperative. A Lhasa Apso is intelligent and is able to learn quickly. Always use positive reinforcements and rewards. Socialize early and extensively; the more he gets used to a puppy, the more well rounded adult dog he will make later. Never force your Lhasa Apso to associate with strangers. Introduce him heartily, but don’t overwhelm. Crate training will help with the difficulty to housebreak. Try very hard to make all training sessions fun and rewarding for him.
A Lhasa Apso is a small but sturdy dog with beautiful dark eyes. They have a long, heavy, straight coat with a hard texture. Below that sweet and innocent expression is quite the stubborn fellow. To keep his coat looking gorgeous, brush him daily. Bathe him once a week and trim his bottom hair as needed. Check his ears frequently to avoid infections. Clip his coat every few months. When properly groomed, a Lhasa Apso should be a low shedder.