Ragdoll

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Ragdolls have a gentle, affectionate nature. They are quiet and laidback, more apt to be found on the floor or a sofa than the top of your refrigerator. They are not the least bit lazy though; they do love a great play session. They are quick to figure out food puzzles and adore fishing-pole toys. Expect your Ragdoll to follow you around.
The Ragdoll is a large feline. Males tip the scales at between 12 to 20 pounds, while females weigh in at 8 to 15 pounds. Their coat is semi-long, plush and silky. Care, though, is easy. His hair doesn’t mat easily, so brush him once or twice a week to keep him glossy.
Ragdolls have light colored bodies with darker points on the face, ears, legs and tail. Ragdolls points come in solid colors of seal, blue, chocolate, lilac and red and cream, as well as various
patterns and shading, including bi-color, van, colorpoint and mitted patterns. Ragdoll kittens are born white. Their points and patterns emerge at 10 days of age. However their full coat color and length is reached at 2 to 3 years of age. All Ragdolls have sapphire blue eyes.
The Ragdoll is one of the most popular longhaired breeds. Social and loving, this is a cat that enjoys people and gets along great with all ages of kids and breeds of dogs. This loving desire to be part
of a loving family has earned the breed the nickname “puppycat.” Ragdolls can be taught to fetch and to come when called. The Ragdoll is a cat that remains playful all their lives. It takes them a while to mature, somewhere between three to four years.
Ragdolls originated in the early 1960s after a Persian breeders bred a semi-feral longhaired white cat that resembled an Angora to other cats that she owned and/or found. One of these cats, Josephine, exhibited endearing, desirable traits that the breeder selectively used to create the Ragdoll breed. The Ragdoll got its name for his habit of going limp in your arms when you hold him. There is much debate about whether they still exhibit this trait. They are definitely a lap cat and adore their people so much, so they adore getting picked up and carried around. (Great news for your toddler if they lose their baby dolls.)

Ragamuffin

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The Ragamuffin is a large cat that takes 4 years to fully mature.  Males weigh 12 to 20 pounds, while females weigh 8 to 15 pounds. Altered males are more likely to reach the 20-pound mark than intact males.
The Ragamuffin body is rectangular and sports a broad chest and shoulders and moderately heavy muscles in the hindquarters. The hindquarters are as broad as the shoulders. Ragamuffins usually have a fatty pad on the lower abdomen. The legs are medium in length and heavily boned. The back legs are slightly longer than the front. The paws are large and round and able to support the weight of the cat without splaying. Fir tufts should be beneath and between the paws.
The head is a broad, modified wedge with a round appearance. The forehead should be moderately rounded. The muzzle is rounded and broad. The chin is rounded with full cheeks. The whisker pads should appear “puffy.” The neck is short and heavy and strong. The tail is long and medium with a slight taper and plumed. The medium-sized ears flare slightly and tilted slightly forward. They are rounded and sit on the side as much as on the top of the head. The eyes are large, moderately wide set, walnut-shaped and expressive. The more intense the eye color, the better. All eye colors are allowed and eye color depends on the coat color. The Ragamuffin comes in almost all colors, with the exception of pointed colors and patterns, with or without white.
The Ragamuffin is not a new breed; simply a newly recognized breed. The history of the Ragamuffin is intertwined with the history of the Ragdoll. (They are not the same breed.) All true Ragdolls can be traced through a California breeder. All Ragamuffins can also be traced to these bloodlines.  The foundation cat for the Ragdoll is a semi-feral longhaired white female, Josephine, that resembled a Turkish Angora. Four of her offspring (Fugianna, Daddy War Bucks, Tiki and Buckwheat) spread their seed like wildfire and many Ragdoll and Ragamuffins can be traced back to these
five cats. The breeder claims she developed several breeds. One — the Cherubim — was the umbrella breed from which all the others developed.
She then set up tight breeding guidelines and programs. Eventually, other breeders got tired of all this red tape and wanted to branch out and form their own catteries and programs. By 1993, most of these other breeders had broken away. This was when the Ragamuffin name first appeared. Ragamuffins are quite similar (but not identical) in conformation and temperament to the Ragdoll. The Ragamuffin is described as a combination of all the Cherubim breeds, to explain the wider array of colors that Ragamuffins can come in.
Ragamuffins are people-oriented and affectionate. Think of them as large, cuddly teddy bears. They love to be pampered and cuddled. They have mellow, sweet dispositions. They develop strong bonds and crave your attention. They live to please and are calm, easygoing and patient felines. They tend to go limp in your arms simply because they love to be cuddled so much. A Ragamuffin is the ultimate lap cat! They tend to greet everyone at the door — they have not heard of this concept called a stranger. This should give you plenty of reason to keep your Ragamuffin indoors only. A Ragamuffin can be easily trained to walk on a leash, fetch and to beg. They adore other cats and cat-friendly dogs. They love children of all ages — don’t be surprised to find your Ragamuffin curled up in the stroller of your toddler or schoolager. Not overly athletic, they enjoy a good play session. Ragamuffins are quiet cats; they love to listen and offer love, purrs and cuddles in response. They want to be involved in all your activities. Some fans will delight in telling you that one Ragamuffin is never enough. Like Lays chips, betcha can’t have just one.